I go in dry, come out wet, the longer im in the stronger i get. What am i?

"I go in dry and come out wet, the longer I’m in, the stronger I get. What am I?" A tea bag.

Tea is a name given to a lot of brews, but purists consider only green tea, black tea, white tea, oolong tea, and pu-erh tea the real thing. They are all derived from the Camellia sinensis plant, a shrub native to China and India, and contain unique antioxidants called iflavonoids.

The most potent of these, known as ECGC, may help against free radicals that can contribute to cancer, heart disease, and clogged arteries. All these teas also have caffeine and theanine, which affect the brain and seem to heighten mental alertness.

The more processed the tea leaves, usually the less polyphenol content. Polyphenols include flavonoids. Oolong and black teas are oxidized or fermented, so they have lower concentrations of polyphenols than green tea; but their antioxidizing power is still high.

Tea is only second to water when it comes to beverage popularity—so popular that it's consumed as much as coffee, soft drinks, and alcohol combined. There's always time for better tea, though, so here are ten tips and tricks to take your tea to the next level at Lifehacker.com.

Buying loose tea in bulk saves money, but if you're not a fan of cleaning out a tea ball after each use, try making these easy tea bags that you can personalize with your favorite flavors.

These cute satchels make wonderful homemade gifts for everyone ranging to co-workers to your grandma. All you need are a few basic materials to create these bundles of happiness that are also great to bring with you on your trips. Learn how to make homemade tea bags for traveling or gifting at Popsugar.com.

Updated on Thursday, August 20 2015 at 11:46AM EDT
Collection: tea