How did jack bondurant forrest bondurant howard bondurant die and when

Jack Bondurant (born on April 8, 1910) died November 6, 2000 at the age of 90.

Forrest Bondurant (born on November 21, 1901) died December 4, 1965 from pneumonia.

Howard Bondurant (born on January 3, 1898) died November 2, 1968, peacefully at age 70.

Their remains were buried at Roselawn Burial Park in Virginia.

The life of the "Bondurant Brothers" was depicted in the movie Lawless, written by Jack Bondurant's grandson, Matt Bondurant, a novelist and creative writing teacher at the University of Dallas.

Matt never got a chance to ask his grandfather about his life, so he decided to write it as fiction. He relied mostly on newspaper articles and court transcripts which provide a scattered picture.

The film was set in 1931 during Prohibition when moonshine was shipped out of the county to large cities, the Bondurant brothers stand up to a violent special agent from Chicago who demands a large take of their moonshine profits. Read more about the film at The Franklin News-Post.

In the film, Forrest routinely cheats death and the idea that the Bondurants are immortal was presented, though at the end of the film, he died of pneumonia.

Jack, the youngest of the three died on Monday, November 6, 2000 in Memorial Hospital of Martinsville and Henry County. Howard on the other hand silently joined Forrest in peace in 1968 at the age of 70.

Speaking of prohibition, David Armistead is accustomed to visitors coming into Tennessee Valley Pecan Co. to sample his pecans. They still come for that, but now they also are coming to see a piece of Decatur's history linked to the Prohibition era.

After moving his business from one location to another on Bank Street, Armistead learned from his landlord that the building has one of the city's remaining tunnels used to keep booze out of sight. This tunnel goes toward Bank Street, but there is no evidence that it ever went beyond the brick wall near the front part of the building. A few empty bottles remain in the tunnel, but it mostly houses empty boxes with date stamps from the 1930s, when prohibition ended. Read more at AL.com.

Updated on Tuesday, January 13 2015 at 03:39AM EST