What is the body of water surrounding the statue of liberty

The body of water that surrounds both Liberty Island (home to the Statue of Liberty), as well as Ellis Island, is New York Harbor; it's the body of water where the Hudson River meets the Atlantic Ocean.

Liberty Enlightening the World (French: La liberté éclairant le monde), known more commonly as the Statue of Liberty (Statue de la Liberté), is a statue given to the United States by the Paris based Union Franco-Americaine (Franco-American Union) in 1876, standing at Liberty Island (originally known as Bedloe's Island) at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor as a welcome to all visitors, immigrants, and returning Americans.

The copper statue, dedicated on October 28, 1886, commemorates the centennial of the United States and is a gesture of friendship between the two nations. The sculptor was Frederic Auguste Bartholdi. Alexandre Gustave Eiffel, the designer of the Eiffel Tower, engineered the internal structure. Eugène Viollet-le-Duc was responsible for the choice of copper in the statue's construction and adoption of the Repoussé technique.

There are two ways to reach Liberty Island, a ferry ride from Battery Park in Manhattan, NY, or a ferry ride from Liberty State Park in Jersey City, NJ; no private boats are allowed to dock at either island.

TICKET OPTIONS

Crown Reserve Ticket (Adult: $21.50 | Senior 62+: $17 | Child 4-12: $12)

Ticket includes access to the Crown and Pedestal of the Statue of Liberty National Monument. Limited Tickets Available.

What you get with this ticket:

• Access up to the Crown of the Statue of Liberty.

• Priority entry into the Screening Facility Queue which saves you wait time at the departure point.

• Access to the grounds of Liberty Island and Ellis Island.

• Audio Tours of Liberty and Ellis Island included

Pedestal Reserve Ticket (Adult: $18.50 | Senior 62+: $14 | Child 4-12: $9 | Child (0-3): Free Admission)

Ticket includes access to the Fort Wood section of the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty National Monument. Limited Tickets Available.

What you get with this ticket:

• Access up to the Fort Wood section of the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty.

• Priority entry into the Screening Facility Queue which saves you wait time at the departure point.

• Access to the grounds of Liberty Island and Ellis Island.

• Audio Tours of Liberty and Ellis Island included.

Reserve Ticket (Adult: $18.50 | Senior 62+: $14 | Child 4-12: $9 | Child (0-3): Free Admission)

Ticket provides access grounds access to the Statue of Liberty National Monument.

What you get with this ticket:

• Access to the grounds of Liberty Island and Ellis Island.

• Priority entry into the Screening Facility Queue which saves you wait time at the departure point.

• Audio Tours of Liberty and Ellis Island included.

Note: When choosing your reservation date and time, this is your entry into the Security Facility and not a specific ferry departure. Ferries depart from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. approximately every 20-35 minutes.

Park Rangers or volunteers can provide answers to questions and information about the Statue of Liberty's history, and make recommendations for your visit. Several historic images of the Statue are on display, and park brochures are available.

Visiting the Statue of Liberty is extremely popular with travelers coming to New York City. Especially in the summer, this can mean long waits for the ferry, but here are some insider tips and advice from Tripsavvy.com, that will help you save yourself time and make the most of your visit to the Statue of Liberty.

Allow Plenty of Time for Your Visit

If you want to visit both the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, allow 5-6 hours for your visit. For the Statue of Liberty alone, it will take about 2-3 hours if you attend a tour. Arrive at the ferry 2 hours prior to your tour to ensure timely arrival.

Arrive Early to Avoid Lines & Buy Your Ticket In Advance

Lines for the ferry to Liberty Island are longest on weekends in the summer, but even during the week, the wait can be over an hour to get on the ferry. Plan to visit the Statue of Liberty during the week if possible and catch the first ferry of the day to avoid unnecessary waiting.

You can skip the ticket line and head right to security if you buy your ticket in advance. Tickets are time-sensitive so make sure you buy the right one for your visit and keep in mind the 24-hour cancellation/rescheduling option.

Pack a Picnic

There is plenty of space for enjoying a picnic lunch on Liberty Island. You can avoid the lines at the concession stand (as well as the overpriced, fairly mediocre food) by bringing along a picnic lunch of snacks from one of New York City's great gourmet grocery stores.

Prepare For The Sun

It is strongly recommended that you bring sunblock and pack water if the weather looks warm and bright. There isn't a lot of shade on Liberty Island and even with the breeze on the ferry, it's easy to get a sunburn. If you're making the trek up to the Statue's Crown, you'll definitely want to bring water along. It is typically much warmer inside the monument than it is outside during the warmer months, but it's not climate controlled inside the statue, so in the winter you will probably still want to wear your jacket.

Store Your Things in a Locker

If you're going inside of the Statue of Liberty, only small purses and camera bags are allowed inside the monument (and will be inspected). There are lockers for rent ($2 for 2 hours) in the Liberty Island gift shop. Keep in mind that the interior of the Statue isn't climate controlled, so if it's cold out, you'll still want your coat and if it's hot out, you will want your water bottle to keep you hydrated while you climb.

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