White oval pill with 58 on one side and tv on the other

Not Medical Advice: Pill imprint TV 58 has been identified as Tramadol hydrochloride 50 mg.

Tramadol is a narcotic-like pain reliever that is used to treat moderate to severe pain. It is used in the treatment of back pain, chronic pain, anxiety, rheumatoid arthritis and more.

The extended-release form of tramadol is for around-the-clock treatment of pain. This form of tramadol is not for use on an as-needed basis for pain.

You should not take tramadol if you have severe breathing problems, a blockage in your stomach or intestines, or if you have recently used alcohol, sedatives, tranquilizers, narcotic medication, or an MAO inhibitor (isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine, and others).

Tramadol can slow or stop your breathing, and may be habit-forming. MISUSE OF THIS MEDICINE CAN CAUSE ADDICTION, OVERDOSE, OR DEATH, especially in a child or other person using the medicine without a prescription.

This medicine is not for use in children younger than 12 years old. Ultram ER should not be given to anyone younger than 18 years old.

Taking tramadol during pregnancy may cause life-threatening withdrawal symptoms in the newborn.

Fatal side effects can occur if you use tramadol with alcohol, or with other drugs that cause drowsiness or slow your breathing.

You should not take tramadol if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

severe asthma or breathing problems;

a blockage in your stomach or intestines;

if you have recently used alcohol, sedatives, tranquilizers, or narcotic medications; or

if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days (such as isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, or tranylcypromine).

Tramadol should not be given to a child younger than 12 years old. Ultram ER should not be given to anyone younger than 18 years old.

Do not give tramadol to anyone younger than 18 years old who recently had surgery to remove the tonsils or adenoids.

Take tramadol exactly as prescribed. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Tramadol can slow or stop your breathing, especially when you start using this medicine or whenever your dose is changed. Never take tramadol in larger amounts, or for longer than prescribed. Tell your doctor if the medicine seems to stop working as well in relieving your pain.

Tramadol Dosage

Applies to the following strength(s): 50 mg ; 100 mg/24 hours ; 200 mg/24 hours ; 300 mg/24 hours ; 150 mg/24 hours.

Usual Adult Dose for Pain

Immediate-release: 50 to 100 mg orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed for pain

Maximum dose: 400 mg per day

Usual Adult Dose for Chronic Pain

For patients with moderate to moderately severe chronic pain not requiring rapid onset of analgesic effect, tolerability can be improved by initiating slowly

Immediate-Release:

-Initial dose: 25 mg orally once a day; titrate in 25 mg increments every 3 days to reach a dose of 25 mg four times a day; thereafter increase by 50 mg as tolerated every 3 days to reach a dose of 50 mg four times a day

-Maintenance dose: After titration, 50 to 100 mg orally as needed for pain every 4 to 6 hours

-Maximum dose: 400 mg per day

Extended-Release:

-Initial dose (tramadol-naive): 100 mg orally once a day; titrate upwards in 100 mg increments every 5 days as needed and as tolerated.

-Maximum Dose: 300 mg orally per day

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to tramadol: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

noisy breathing, sighing, shallow breathing;

a slow heart rate or weak pulse;>####a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;

seizure (convulsions);

infertility, missed menstrual periods;

impotence, sexual problems, loss of interest in sex;

low cortisol levels - nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, dizziness, worsening tiredness or weakness; or

severe skin reaction - fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Seek medical attention right away if you have symptoms of serotonin syndrome, such as: agitation, hallucinations, fever, sweating, shivering, fast heart rate, muscle stiffness, twitching, loss of coordination, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.

Do not drink alcohol. Dangerous side effects or death could occur. In case of overdosing, seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Get more detailed info about Tramadol and its uses, side effects, dosage and more at Drugs.com.

Of interest, an African plant called Nauclea latifolia has been found to be a natural source of the synthetic opioid tramadol.

It is colloquially known as the African peach or pin cushion tree and grows widely across Central and West Africa and is used by local populations to treat a wide variety of ailments, including epilepsy, malaria, general pain and many infectious diseases. Learn more here.

Tip! Prevention.com shares 8 Surprising (And Natural) Ways To Beat Pain.

Tag: pill 
Tuesday, September 05 2017
Source: http://www.drugs.com/imprints/tv-58-17280.html